Cold Steel Rules Introduction

071027nap24aCold Steel is a set of rules designed and developed by the Napoleonic group at NWA, particularly Andrew and Tim Bayly.

25mm metal figures are mainly used at the club, although one member uses well painted 20mm plastics. The Napoleonic group is active at both the Mitcham and the Croydon venues.

 


Cold Steel

Cold Steel is a set of rules designed and developed by the Napoleonic group at NWA, particularly Andrew and Tim Bayly.

25mm metal figures are mainly used, although one member uses well painted 20mm plastics.

The rules are designed for fighting battalion level actions.

Shown on this page are photos from several battles that took place NWA club meetings.

Cold Steel was developed in 1996 when players at NWA couldn't decide on the best set of rules and desired a fast play set of Napoleonics. The rules are open, with any person able to make any rule suggestions and if the players agree with the changes it is included in the rules.

Expanded through several revisions, Version 7 was published in late 2007.

Front cover of the rule book.

French infantry regiment.

British heavy cavalry - the Scots Greys.

British officer tanning his brow.

Italian artillery battery in French service.

The philosophy of these rules is playability. It has been proven time and again over a number of years using these rules that how you set up and employ your troops using historical formations and tactics will determine whether you will win or lose. And, once you have read the rules and played a few games the game sequence is very easy to follow and is consistent.

Second, the basic unit in the game is the battalion of infantry, regiment of cavalry or battery of artillery so the game is played tactically at this level. Each player determines the order in which the individual units in the army are moved, fired, charged etc and what formation this used. This means the sequence of an attack may be developed to maximise the advantage. Once a unit has been moved and the next unit chosen, a player cannot return to a previously moved unit to change its movement or to fire the unit. – Fog Of War – things left undone remain undone.

French in mixed order - a line supported either side by columns.

With a lot of cavalry about, the Prussians have formed square.

Prussian cavalry pointing the way.

The third aspect of the game is initiative. Each unit can perform a set number of actions i.e. move, change formation, change facing, charge, enter a building etc and to do this it will take a set number of functions. Different actions may cost 1,2 or 3 functions to perform. Each unit has three functions. Therefore a unit can spend all three functions moving or it may perform up to three actions by spending, for example, one function to move, one function to change formation from column to line and one function to fire at the enemy.

The fourth component of the philosophy of the rules is that while it is turn based, it is an action – reaction game. When a player is the active player (it is his turn), his units can perform a total of 11 actions whereas the reactive player has a total of 19 reactive actions his units may perform, depending on the actions of the active player. With this the game flows with the realistic feel of simultaneous movement (just like real life).

Lieutenenant "Dicky" Blunt of the famous 95th Rifles.

British Hussars and Scots Greys.

20mm plastic cavalry and gun teams.

TURN SEQUENCE

First Player

1. Divisional Morale

2. Command and control

3. Player movement

4. Rally broken units

5. Movement of generals

6. Injured/dead generals replaced

 

Second Player

1. Divisional Morale

2. Command and control

3. Player movement

4. Rally broken units

5. Movement of generals

6. Injured/dead generals replaced

 

Safe from cavalry in the walled garden of a French farm.

Hussars moving in column.

Prussian army.

BASES

Time scale: Each turn is an ill determined period of time (about 15 minutes) in which all units can utilise three “functions”.

Ground scale: 3 inches equals 100 yards.

Base sizes per individual figure: Infantry 3 rank: 12mm by 20mm Infantry 2 rank: 16 mm by 20mm Cavalry: 25mm by 40mm Artillery per 2 guns: 25mm by 60mm Skirmishers 50mm by 20mm

POINTS SYSTEM

A points system has been developed to allow players to choose whatever forces they wish to field, but result in a balanced battle. The typical number of points used at meetings is 1500 points.

Portuguese Cacadores aid the British Peninsular army.

Prussian columns advancing.

French Chasseurs a Cheval protect the flank of their infantry columns.